Lost in the Details | Venice, Italy

Italy is all texture and patina, and in summer the city of Venice is rich with seemingly endless variety; every detail and architectural style basking in the luminous reflected light of warm sun on water.

While I only had a few days to explore Venice, the number of photos I captured there far outnumbered all other locations I visited in Italy. Around every corner was a striking new visual surprise, a glimpse through history, and an invitation to keep walking just a little further…

Accommodations were in a historic palazzo overlooking the Grand Canal, and the rich textures of age and time could be found throughout the halls. From ornate plasterwork and window details to the high-water mark of the historic 1966 flood, carved into the stone door frame.

On one day’s wander toward the university district, I came across a quiet courtyard and art gallery on the campus of the Universit√† Ca’ Foscari; exquisite venetian glass windows and beautiful architecture were a welcome quiet escape from the bustle and heat of the summer crowds just outside the university gates.

Textural brick and stone, plaster, faded paint and layers of patina, all mixed with the cascading light and shadow of winding, narrow passages. Enjoying these details required an acceptance that I would get lost somewhere in the streets of Venice, and it quickly became one of my favourite feelings as I relinquished all sense of direction and simply soaked up the sights.

And on and on…for weeks after visiting Venice, Italy for the first time, I dreamt of being happily lost there, following the winding streets past softly-hued pink and yellow brick walls and ornate, elegant cathedral windows. Find more sun-splashed piazzas, shimmering canals, and Venetian details in my gallery of Venice, Italy images.

My first impressions and more beautiful scenes from Venice, Italy can be found in my blog archives, Venice, Italy : Love at First Light.

St. Nicholas Abbey, Barbados

In the lush highlands of the Caribbean island of Barbados is a beautifully preserved slice of history; St. Nicholas Abbey is a sugar plantation and rum distillery, boasting a Jacobean mansion built in 1658, beautiful gardens, and a richly preserved historical and cultural context that is expertly conveyed during tours of the house and property.

Entering the grounds, the large trees and sweeping pastoral views are striking, leaves and grass gently blowing in the steady ocean breeze and lush greenery filling every corner of the gardens. The elegant house has been carefully restored, and while it shows a bit of its age in weathered paint, it is remarkably well-preserved even after hundreds of years in the tropical climate.

Inside the house, details like a shell-encrusted chandelier and portraits of historic owners of the property add color to the stories shared by the tour guide. Walking through the home, the grounds of the plantation are glimpsed at open windows.

After pausing in a quiet courtyard, the tour continued on to the rum tasting room. Originally the stables, this charming building has been renovated by the current property owner who also happens to be an architect, to house a museum, gift shop and tasting room. Here we lingered amongst the barrels and exhibits of artifacts, including slave records, before being shown a remarkable film of archival footage from the 1930’s detailing life on the sugar plantation.

After our refreshments the tour continued on a leisurely walk through lush gardens to the bottling and production facilities. In the bottling and labelling facility, formerly the Overseer’s Quarters, rum bottles are hand labelled and the corks adorned with a leather badge, stamped in-house.

The factory and adjacent distillery includes displays of equipment for growing and processing sugar cane, and for the production of rum. The architectural details and dedication to preservation found throughout the property were remarkable, and one of the nicest surprises were the remnants of a large windmill behind the factory, where workers were piling cane for processing.

After the tour ended, we wandered the grounds, basking in the highland breezes and balmy sunshine. Artifacts are cleverly incorporated throughout the gardens, offering some unique photo opportunities.

I absolutely recommend a visit to St. Nicholas Abbey in Barbados, not only is the rum delicious but the opportunity to enjoy a close-encounter with the rich and varied history of Barbados is placed front-and-center when one takes a guided tour of the plantation property. This is a travel destination apart from the typical crowds closer to Bridgetown, and a strong sense of hospitality and pride in the place and product is very apparent.

To see the full gallery of my photos from St. Nicholas Abbey, Barbados, please visit apkphotography.com

*As a footnote, this is the first batch of images I am sharing from my new Fuji X100F, for which I could not resist using the Velvia film simulation when editing. While I continue to shoot with my full-frame Nikon D800 dslr, I wanted a smaller camera for travel, and so far the Fuji X100F has exceeded all expectations. After a few more trips, I hope to share some tips and a full review of the camera.